Dustin Vande Hoef
Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship

Articles by this author:

A highly destructive beetle that targets and kills ash trees, the emerald ash borer has been confirmed in Decatur County. EAB was first discovered in Iowa in 2010. Now 53 counties in Iowa have been confirmed with the presence of EAB.

An invasive beetle that kills ash trees, the emerald ash borer, has been confirmed in Ringgold County, making it the 52nd county in Iowa where this highly destructive insect has been found.

The emerald ash borer has been positively identified from a residential tree in Clarksville. Butler County now becomes the 51st county in Iowa where this invasive pest has been confirmed.

Emerald ash borer has been found in Benton, Buena Vista, Floyd, Howard, and Warren counties. More than half of Iowa's counties now have confirmed infestations.
 

The emerald ash borer can now be linked to 45 counties in Iowa as Fayette and Madison counties are the most recent to be added to that growing list. EAB is a destructive wood-boring beetle that attacks and kills all ash tree species. This exotic pest was first discovered in Iowa in 2010.

The emerald ash borer, an exotic species of beetle that attacks and decimates ash trees, has been confirmed in Greene and Wayne counties. Native to Asia, EAB has now made its way to 43 counties in Iowa.

Emerald ash borer, a highly destructive insect that attacks and kills ash trees, has been confirmed in Bellevue and Marquette. Native to Asia, EAB is responsible for the death of tens of millions of ash trees nationwide.

Iowa Secretary of Agriculture Bill Northey, Iowa State University College of Agriculture and Life Sciences Associate Dean John Lawrence and Iowa farmer Larry Buss of Logan yesterday announced the release of the Iowa Pest Resistance Management Plan.

Emerald ash borer, an invasive beetle that attacks and kills all ash species, has been positively identified in the city of Osceola in Clarke County. Since the first Iowa detection in 2010, EAB has now been confirmed in 39 counties.

Farmers are reminded to wait until soil temperatures remain below 50 degrees Fahrenheit before applying anhydrous ammonia (NH3) fertilizer this fall.