Greg Wallace
Organizational Advancement

515-294-1327
gwallace@iastate.edu

Articles by this author:

Home gardeners can successfully grow grapes in Iowa’s climate. Grapes can flourish in a backyard garden or a vineyard, but obstacles like insects and knowing the proper harvest time can keep them from reaching their full potential.

Fruit trees can provide an abundance of nutritious, high quality, fresh fruit during the growing season. However, it can be difficult to know when to harvest fruit such as plums, apricots and peaches for full flavor and value.

Trees add value and beauty to any landscape, and can provide shade, protection and much more. When they’re afflicted with unknown ailments, there’s natural reason for concern.

Onions are a common part of garden crops across Iowa, but harvesting, drying and storing them can come with difficulties for the uninitiated. How can these issues be avoided?

With hot, dry summer weather prevailing over much of Iowa, rain has been at a premium for many lawns. That brings up an important question: is it necessary to water lawns during such weather conditions? And if so, how much?

This summer, Japanese beetles have made their presence known in many parts of Iowa, emerging in mid-June to eat the foliage, fruits and flowers of many different types of plants. It's common to find a horde of a dozen or more beetles at a time. That’s concerning, but how can foliage be protected?

Summer is the right time for garden plants to bloom and produce a great harvest, perfect for preparing in the kitchen and enjoying at the dinner table. But when such plants don’t produce fruit, what can a gardener do?

Raspberries are popular with many home gardeners. They’re easy to grow, and perform well in much of Iowa. However, gardeners can run into issues with heat, weeds and pruning that can curtail yields.

Going through the process of planting fruit-bearing plants for gardens and landscapes is exciting, but it does require some patience. Not all plants are ready to bear fruit immediately, and it might be smart to exercise caution.

A pair of educators stepped in to fill a void caused by a lack of agriculture education in northwest Iowa – and the results have been amazing. What began as a series of agriculture-related field trips has turned into a concerted effort to push students into agriculture careers at Iowa State University and elsewhere.